Finding an Alcohol Awareness Class in Your State

Often when students need to find an alcohol awareness class in their state, they don't know where to start. Not only do they have to choose between an 8 hour Level 1, 16 hour Level 2 and 24 hour Level 3 alcohol class, but they also need to find one close to their location. Fortunately there are online courses available in every state in the U.S. that can help them. These courses are available 24 hours a day:

The Medical Benefits of Giving Up Alcohol

Often when I teach alcohol awareness classes clients ask me, "Is alcohol really that unhealthy for you?" This article will address some of the main physical benefits of abstaining from alcohol, and then will detail the mental and psychological advantages of quitting boozing.

You are not going to hear too many arguments in favor of drinking alcohol. Of course some studies will say a small amount is good for the heart, or that a single glass of red wine routine makes for a healthy heart and increases longevity. Research, however, is not conclusive about any medicinal effects of alcohol. With respect to the wine theory that is still being debated grape juice and grapes themselves have shown to be equally effective.

There are many proven good effects when one ceases drinking. There are countless studies that prove how no longer drinking alcohol improves your physical and mental health. Non-drinkers have far less chance of developing cirrhosis of the liver, pancreas damage and many types of cancer. Alcohol dehydrates the human body. After you stop drinking, one of the first positive physical effects you will notice is that you skin will become clearer, more vibrant and younger This happens after the first few days of stopping drinking. It's incredible what being hydrated will do for your appearance. An increase in energy is another effect that should be felt in the first week of quitting.

While the physical effects on your body are extremely important, it is positive state of mind and mental effects that will be most noticeable. If you ever have quit a substance that you had been using frequently or sometimes abusing you know that at you begin to ascertain that you do feel better. You are proud of the fact you have stop using and even more pleased that you feel good about it. Improved self-regard gives a huge encouragement to those who quit drinking.

You will find that when you quit drinking you will have more time - for work, hobbies, friends, and family. Life is all about getting involved in personal relationships with other human beings. As you begin to feel better physically, mentally, emotionally and psychologically you will become more active in your own life, and those who care about you will also enjoy the benefits as you reconnect on a healthy, upbeat level.

As you rejoin life after drinking old hobbies may once again give you the enjoyment you used to know and the thought of trying out something new will sound exciting. New interests like art, sports or social clubs could invigorate and bring fullness to your life. Having a positive self-image will certainly make you more optimistic. Healthier brain cells firing on all cylinders make life more interesting.

In closing, I encourage each of you to quit drinking for a 30 days. See if you feel better. Be aware of your moods, good and bad (there may be some strong ones at the beginning if you are a heavy drinker).

Can an Alcohol Awareness Class Make you Healthier?

Many people who take an online alcohol class think they will be bored and to have the subject matter completely unrelated to them. They come in expecting alcoholic beverages as a legal, harmless beverage that somehow got them into trouble. Almost no student sees that they have a problem

Most people I've met  drink. Some estimates say that 50% of all adult U.S. Citizens aged 12 and older have consumed alcohol within the past 30 days. Among this group of current drinkers almost a quarter admitted to have indulged in binge drinking (5 or more drinks during any 24 hour period ). Of those between the ages of eighteen and twenty five the number of binge drinkers swelled to more than 40%.

Many of my students say that, "only alcoholics drink heavily" . They think that "homeless people" and "bums" are typical alcoholics. The majority of people have a mental image that all alcoholics are "complete losers." This is not reality People who abuse alcohol come from all walks of life, from corporate CEOs, teachers, attorneys, police officers. You name it. There is no race or profession where alcoholism does not exist.

Binge drinking five or more times in the past month is what defines heavy drinking. A lot of these students, especially those in their early twenties, were shocked to learn that they too have habitually engaged in binge drinking, and that this is basically abusing alcohol. Your age doesn't matter.

One of the most crucial aspects of an alcohol awareness class is to come face to face with the realities of alcohol - your mind and body risks, and also understanding drinking patterns and how each student fits in. With court-required alcohol programs, you have a bunch of students who have each had at least one difficult situation in their life related to alcohol. That's really the only reason why they come to my classroom.

As the alcohol awareness class proceeds I slowly see the dawning recognition in their eyes as the students try to place themselves within these well-known patterns. There is not a student that cannot relate to the topics at hand. Recognizing and admitting there could be a problem can be the toughest challenge people who consume alcohol face. This doesn't mean that all drinkers have a problem. Quite the contrary, the majority of people can master their drinking and do not have any issues.

The Super Bowl Focuses on the Wrong Kind of Alcohol Awareness

As a counselor for alcohol awareness classes I am very familiar with the role drinking plays in our community and is meshed in our culture. My aim in instructing about alcoholism is trying to get my students to become more educated about alcohol and its impact on the human body. I try to make them aware about alcoholism and its impact on not only your body, but in addition those close to an individual addicted to alcohol.

At this time of year I frequently believe about another type of "alcohol awareness" - the strong pitch to advertise drinking during the Super Bowl. The advertisements from Budweiser, Coors, and Jack Daniels have become to many people, more interesting from a viewing standpoint than the game itself. When people think "Super Bowl" they think football, TV ads and alcohol - and not necessarily in that order.

Let's All Drink to the Super Bowl

Nobody should be surprised that "Super Bowl Sunday" competes  with  the 4th of July and December 31 as the time of year where the greatest number of people are arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol.

In one of my recent alcohol classes I polled each of my students how many drank during the Super Bowl, and if they drank how much they drank. The results probably don't shock you. Out of 20 students, 18 of them had consumed alcohol during the previous Super Bowl. The couple that didn't - one was working and the other had the flu.

A Super Binge

Of the 18 who had admitted to drinking according to their memory, during the game they averaged 8 drinks apiece. Of course they argued that the game lasts forever and most were sure that they were OK to drive by the time the game was over. 50% of the 18 admitted to being "drunk" during the game. One feel asleep before the conclusion.

Super Bowl DUI

Only one of my students that day was in class to take care of a Super Bowl DUI, but over the years a larger number of my students were requred to take an alcohol awareness class from a DWI received after watching the Super Bowl.

Don't become a statistic. I encourage each and every one of you to make sure you have a designated driver for the Super Bowl if you plan on consuming alcoholic beverages. Remember, a cab is ALWAYS cheaper than a DUI.

Moving Past Denial Part 2

Often when I teach alcohol awareness classes I question my students, “Do you think you have a drinking problem?” This set of blog entries will discuss what is a “problem” and understant your social drinking has become a problem-drinking habit. We will also address 3 stages of change – denial, anger, and acceptance. Finally, it will conclude with strategies for stopping drinking and preventing a return to drinking patterns.

Let's start by stating that no person has one drink and immediately it is a problem. Heavy drinking and alcoholism are developed over long periods of time.

How people in my class answer this query may surprise you. But first, let’s take a look at what defines heavy drinking and briefly talk about problematic alcohol consumption patterns.

How Much Alcohol Do You Consume Weekly? Daily?

As a recovering alcoholic and graduate of an online alcohol class, I became aware that there might be a problem when I encountered an fascinating question on a new patient form at my primary care physician The question said, "What quantity of alcoholic drinks do you consume on average per week?” The query on its own seems innocent enough. The multiple-choice answer was “A. 0. B. 1-3. C. 4-6. D. More than six”. I needed to reread the question to see if they weren’t actually asking per day.

At that point in my life, still two years before I stopped drinking, I was drinking at least 7 alcoholic beverages every day. Whether shots of hard alcohol, wine, or beer, I was most definitely in the “D” category – but every day.

That was my realization of truth, when I actually figured out, for a few tiny moments, that I might really have a drinking problem – and that I might be an alcoholic.

Are You a Heavy Drinker?

Heavy drinking is a pattern of drinking alcohol seen in almost all alcoholics. Heavy drinking is defined as having at least 5 alcoholic beverages on the same occasion at least five times in a single month.

As a recovering alcoholic, my story is that nearly every time I partook in the consumption of alcohol, I had five or more drinks – usually quite a few more.

Recent statistics show that around 17,000,000 U.S. residents are classified as heavy drinkers. That is almost 1/14 of the entire population 12 and older. If you only pay attention to people who can legally drink almost 12% are heavy drinkers.

If you think your are a heavy drinker, it is very likely you are an alcoholic and should seek help from a group like AA, or in some cases try taking an online alcohol awareness course.

Moving Past Denial Part 1

 

Often when I teach alcohol awareness classes I ask my students, “Do you think you have a drinking problem?” This series of articles will discuss what constitutes a “problem” and recognize that your social drinking habit has turned into a problem-drinking pattern.   It will also address three stages of change – denial, anger and acceptance.  Finally, it will conclude with strategies for becoming sober and preventing recidivism.

Let’s begin by stating that no person has one drink and is immediately it is a problem.  Heavy drinking and alcoholism are developed over long periods of time.  

How my students respond to this question may surprise you.  But first, let’s take a look at what constitutes heavy drinking and briefly discuss problematic drinking patterns.

How Many Drinks Do You Consume Weekly? Daily?

As a reformed alcoholic and graduate of an online alcohol class, I first became aware that there might be a problem when I encountered an interesting question on a new patient questionnaire at a doctor’s office. The question read, “How many alcoholic beverages do you consume on average per week?”  The question itself seems innocuous enough.  The multiple-choice answer was “A. 0.  B1-3. C. 4-6. D. More than six”.  I had to reread the question to see if they weren’t really asking per day.  

At that stage, still two years before I became sober, I was having at least 7 ounces of alcohol per day. Whether shots of hard alcohol, glasses of wine, or beer, I was definitely in the “D” category – but daily.

That was my original lightening rod of truth, where I actually understood, for a few brief moments, that I might very well have a drinking problem – and that problem was alcoholism.

Are You a Heavy Drinker?

Heavy drinking is a pattern of alcohol consumption found in almost all alcoholics.  Heavy drinking is defined as having 5 or more alcoholic beverages on the same occasion five or more times in the past month.

As a recovering alcoholic, I can tell you that nearly every time I partook in the consumption of alcohol, I had five or more drinks – usually many more.

Recent statistics have shown that approximately 17 million people in the United States are classified as heavy drinkers.  That is almost 7% of the entire population 12 and older.  If you only look at those of legal drinking age, 21, almost 12% are considered to fall into the pattern of heavy drinking.

If you are a heavy drinker, it is quite likely you have a drinking problem and should seek help from a group like Alcoholics Anonymous, or if you prefer, try taking an online alcohol awareness course.

This was the first in a series of articles discussing the transition of an alcoholic from denial, to anger and finally to acceptance.  The series will conclude with an article on maintaining your sobriety and help keep you from becoming an ugly statistic of recidivism

In closing, I encourage each of you to quit drinking for 30 days.  See if you feel better.  Be aware of your moods, good and bad (there may be some doozies at the beginning if you are a heavy drinker).

Despite its legal status, it is important to be aware that alcohol is a drug and its use must be controlled.  If you or anyone you know may be suffering from alcohol dependence, please have them seek help immediately.  There are online options to take voluntary and involuntary courses on alcohol rehabilitation.