Could We Mandate Alcohol Education for Serial DUI Offenders?

How many times do you have to drive intoxicated before even you realize what you are doing is extremely stupid? How many times must a person get arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) before they are mandated pedestrian for life? Even if you could mandate this, how would it be accomplished?

The saying older is wiser certainly does not apply in this case. My loyal readers know that the previous blog here at onlinealcoholclass.com dealt with another senior citizen who appears to be a serial DUI offender. As reported in www.ktvu.com.

The police in Santa Rosa, California know William Beall quite well. A habitual DUI driver, police keep him under surveillance. The 68-year-old Beall has been arrested 19 times for driving under the influence and most recently was taken into custody for operating a vehicle with a suspended license, according to Petaluma Police.

Petaluma police officers have a special operation targeting repeat DUI offenders observed a suspect driving away from his home.

Officers contacted the driver, 68-year-old Santa Rosa resident William Beall, who is a known repeat DUI offender with 19 DUI convictions in the past thirty years. Beall's driver's license is currently suspended, so he was taken into custody.

What do you think about this operation? Is this a waste of valuable police resources? I think that the safety of the citizens is paramount and this is a good idea. However, I think we need to figure out a way to keep people like Beall from operating a vehicle at all. How many DUI chances should a person get?

Could Alcohol Courses Help Repeat Offenders?

How many times do you have to drive intoxicated before even you realize what you are doing is extremely stupid and dangerous to self and others? How many times must a person get arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) before their license is revoked? Even if you could mandate this, how would it be accomplished?

Older may not always mean wiser. It can also mean more set in ones ways. My loyal readers know that the previous blog here at onlinealcoholclass.com dealt with a senior citizen who is a serial Dui offender. As reported in www.ktvu.com.

The police in Santa Rosa, California know William Beall quite well. A habitual DUI driver, police keep him under surveillance. The 68-year-old Beall has been arrested 19 times for driving under the influence and most recently was taken into custody for operating a vehicle with a suspended license, according to Petaluma Police.

Petaluma police officers have a special operation targeting repeat DUI offenders observed a suspect driving away from his home.

Officers contacted the driver, 68-year-old Santa Rosa resident William Beall, who is a known repeat DUI offender with 19 DUI convictions in the past thirty years. Beall's driver's license is currently suspended, so he was taken into custody.

What do you think about this operation? Is this a waste of valuable police resources? I think that the safety of the citizens is paramount and this is a good idea. However, I think we need to figure out a way to keep people like Beall from operating a vehicle at all. How many DUI chances should a person get?

10 Hour Alcohol Awareness Class Can Help You Make Smarter Decisions

There is no doubt that alcohol makes people do stupid things. People under the influence, do things that under sober circumstances, would seem idiotic. Getting behind the wheel of a car completely drunk is one of those really bad decisions.

How many people do you think wake up in the morning and say to themselves “I can’t wait to go out and get totally plastered and see how well I can drive?” As reported in www.norwalkreflector.com.

I do not think this Norwalk, Connecticut native thought about that when he woke up.

Robert Dilger was falling down drunk when he was arrested. Older does not mean wiser as the 66-year-old had a blood-alcohol content more than three times the legal limit when he was arrested. To his credit, at least he admitted his guilt.

Dilger’s drunkenness was witnessed first-hand by a patrol officer who saw him hit the rear of a vehicle in front of a gas station. Dilger then went off the road, hit a small sign and stopped. Both Dilger and the other driver went to the hospital with minor injuries.

Nor was this his first DUI. In mid-February 2003, prosecutors dismissed a DUI charge against Dilger due to "lack of evidence" for a conviction, court records state. I do not think Dilger will get off so easily this time. I hope he takes a long look at his choices. I think a 24 hour alcohol awareness would be a helpful place to start.

Bus Driver Needs Alcohol Awarness Program

How terrifying is it to think that the person driving your children to school may be intoxicated? If this sounds like a horror movie, you may want to leave the room now.

A substitute driver in Kokomo, Indiana was sentenced this week to probation and community service for operating his school bus while intoxicated last November.

William Tucker pleaded guilty to a Class C misdemeanor charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or more. As part of the plea agreement, a Class A misdemeanor charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated endangering a person was dropped.

The 42-year-old Tucker was sentenced to time served — which was four days — in addition to one year unsupervised probation, a 90-day license suspension and 200 hours of community service.

Tucker was at Gett’s Tacos in Kokomo shortly before 3 p.m. Nov. 19 when someone saw him pouring what appeared to be a can of beer into a cup. When Tucker saw that he’d been spotted, he turned around and tossed the can to the ground. Then he ran over the can with his bus. Thank goodness for good, concerned citizens.

The witness reported the incident to the district’s transportation director. When Tucker arrived, the director tested Tucker who smelled like alcohol and agreed to take a portable breath test. He had a blood alcohol content of .105.

I hope Tucker takes a good online alcohol class and never operates a vehicle after drinking again.

Alcohol Education Courses Should be Offered to High School Athletes

There is no doubt that both alcohol and drugs are a pressure for adolescents and that drinking and using drugs is a serious problem for some high school students. While getting tipsy or loaded may lower inhibitions and social discomfort, the outcome of this inebriation is not only negative, but it can change the course of a young adults life forever.

The negative toll drugs and alcohol have on high school athletes is very sad. Whether these students are playing competitively during school or trying to enter the collegiate or professional level, abusing the body will wreak havoc on performance. As reported in www.pressherald.com.

Six players on the Boothbay Region High School boys’ basketball team, the defending Western Maine Class C champion, have been suspended from the team just days before this year’s playoffs for violating the school’s athletic pledge.

It is unclear whether they had been drinking alcohol but the pledge they broke was being in a place where alcohol was being consumed.

Three of the six players were starters on the team, which was given a good chance of defending its title but will enter the playoffs with just five varsity players and a sixth, Pinkham, was called up from the junior varsity team.

If they were not drinking do you think this is too harsh of a punishment? I tend to agree that one should not out himself in a compromising situation.

Last fall, about 30 Westbrook High School students were suspended from athletic events after an underage drinking party, but the suspensions were overturned just hours before a football playoff game.

How is this any different? Are football players more politically connected?

I would like to hear what you have to say. So chime in on our onlinealcoholclass.com blog.

Could Alcohol Classes Have Saved Hotels?

Today we continue to look at some interesting facts about the Prohibition Era in America. If you missed previous installment of the onlinealcoholclass.com blog, I encourage you to go back.

In the last couple of blogs we discussed speakeasies, both how they still managed to sell alcohol and then became targets of shutdown by one incorruptible Prohibition officer names Emory Buckner.

Buckner had become success in shutting them down by placing a padlock on their doors, a lock that could be kept on for a full-year without a trial, however, speakeasies opened new "secret" entrances or moved to another location.

Hotels did not have the ability to "just move". The famous Knickerbocker Hotel went under as did the Manhattan Hotel (where the Manhattan cocktail was first created).

Buckner’s padlocking policy proved so successful in New York, that soon it was being used all across the country. Interestingly this policy included a giant redwood tree in California inside which a still was found to be operating.

Ironically, Buckner himself did not believe in Prohibition and admitted he enforced it because it was the law, not out of any moral conviction. He admitted that he had often imbibed before the law and thought it was a terrible mistake.

So, the many who enforced the Volstead Act did not believe in it, nor did the man whose name was attached to it, Andrew Volstead.